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Contents : The Evangelical Review
of Theology and Politics Vol. 2, 2014
Conference Papers: ‘Thy Kingdom Come

THE EVANGELICAL REVIEW OF THEOLOGY & POLITICS
VOL. 2, 2014

CONFERENCE PAPERS
‘Thy Kingdom Come’
A Conference on the Bible, Theology & the Future
October 17-18, 2014

www.thykingdomcome.org.uk

EDITORIAL

Calvin L. Smith, ‘Editorial. Thy Kingdom Come A conference on the Bible, Theology and the Future’

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP1.

PAPERS

Conference Paper, Friday Evening, October 17.
Derek Tidball, ‘Thy Kingdom Come’

KEY WORDS
|| Kingdom of God || Prayer || Inaugurated || Present ||
|| Future || Fulfilment || Apocalyptic || The End ||

ABSTRACT
Starting with the prayer, ‘Your kingdom come’, this paper introduces the sources of the idea of the Kingdom of God which was central to the person, mission and teaching of Jesus. After some preliminary general comments about the Kingdom of God in the New Testament, the teaching of Jesus about its present and future dimensions are reviewed before the latter is more fully explored. Paul’s teaching on the coming kingdom is then surveyed and finally the perspective of apocalyptic is introduced. A brief discursive mentions the relationship between the kingdom and the cross. The paper concludes by referring to the implications of praying, ‘Your kingdom come’.

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP2-10.

Conference Paper, Saturday Morning, October 18.
Calvin Smith, ‘The Coming Kingdom and the Hope of Israel’

KEY WORDS
|| The Kingdom of God || Israel || Romans || Hope ||
|| Eschatology || Biblical Theology || Day of the Lord || Zion ||

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this paper is to set out a case for the hope of Israel in the eschatological future. The primary focus in this paper is Romans, the climax of the Apostle Paul’s discussion and argument concerning ethnic Israel in Romans 9-11, in addition this is framed by drawing on other biblical texts. The aim is to set the scene — and provide a summary in terms of biblical theology — for the case for God’s calling and purpose for the Jewish people, with a special focus on the eschatological place of Israel as set out in Romans 11. In so doing we will establish precise contextual definitions for key terms: Israel, Supersessionism/ Nonsupersessionism, Christian Zionism, and Restorationism, and how this relates to the resolution the Apostle Paul sets-out in Romans 11: Israel is inextricably intertwined in God’s eschatological scheme. The conclusions of this paper will serve as a basis for more detailed hermeneutical and theological treatments of this and related topics in later papers presented at this conference.

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP11-18.

Conference Paper, Saturday Morning, October 18.
Mitch Glaser, ‘The Coming Kingdom and the Great Commission’

KEY WORDS
|| Jewish Evangelism || Missions || Gospel || Kingdom || The Great Commission ||
|| Matthew || Jewish Backgrounds || Eschatology ||

ABSTRACT
This paper argues that God has a plan and purpose for the conclusion of our present age. This future will not be ethereal or non-descript as Scripture outlines coming prophetic events with great detail and specificity. Dr. Glaser, in a thorough exposition of Matt 28:28-20, concludes that Jesus linked the proclamation of the Gospel with His second coming by commanding His disciples to make disciples throughout world “until the end of the age.”

Therefore, Jesus and the disciples were very concerned about the World to Come and Dr. Glaser suggests that the future hope of a literal Messianic kingdom is woven into the very core of both Testaments but presently minimized by a rising eschatological cynicism within the today’s church.

Dr. Glaser develops the task given to the disciples known as the Great Commission through a careful exegesis of the text and discussion of the first century Jewish understanding of what it meant to “make disciples. Further, Glaser demonstrates that the term used in Matt 28:20 and in 24:3 and translated as “end” would best viewed as the consummation of a series of eschatological events surrounding the seconded coming of Jesus. Glaser dismisses the notion that the “end of the age, as the phrase is so often translate should be understood by today’s disciples as simple words of comfort or a conclusion to what has gone before, but rather to an unfolding of “end times” events inclusive of the restoration of Israel, various eschatological judgments and the penultimate return of Christ.

Dr. Glaser argues that Jesus encouraged the disciples to look towards the events of the, the consummation of the age, thereby creating a greater sense of urgency and providing the motivation for fulfilling the Commission. He further suggests that when the events of the future are de-literalized and downplayed that the burden for bringing the Gospel to those without Jesus is diminished.

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP19-45.

Conference Paper, Saturday Afternoon, October 18.
Darrell Bock, ‘The Coming Kingdom and the Words of Jesus’

KEY WORDS
|| Kingdom of God || Eschatology || Israel || Jesus || Acts ||

ABSTRACT
Noting that the kingdom is already, not yet and that Jesus’ outline of what is to come only starts the biblical discussion of the end, this study traces six themes from Jesus’ teaching on the Kingdom to come. It also considers some “until”  texts in Luke-Acts that show hope for Israel’s restoration. Finally there is a look at Acts 1:6-8 showing Jesus taught the hope for Israel’s restoration. The hope of the end is the hope of shalom, justice, and the vindication of the saints.

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP46-61.

Conference Paper, Saturday Afternoon, October 18.
Daniel Nessim, ‘The Coming Kingdom and the Day of the Lord’

KEY WORDS
|| Day of the Lord || Joel || Repentance || Locusts ||
|| Eschatology || Rebellion-Judgement ||

ABSTRACT
The concept of the 'Day of the Lord' requires definition in regard to other 'Days' in the Hebrew Bible and has proven difficult for scholars to find an agreed approach to, let alone come to a consensus definition. The prophet Joel and its locust imagery provide a matrix for interpreting the term. The militarisation of the locust horde in Joel 2 compared to that of Joel 1 clarifies the author's metaphorical intent. It also signals the actual, literal Day of the Lord that Joel wishes to signify. While eschatological in nature, this Day of the Lord can be averted by repentance. Thus Peter's call for repentance in Acts 2, based on the text of Joel 2, can be seen to avert the Day of the Lord and its horrific judgment. In contrast the lack of repentance by the rebellious subjects of Revelation 9 leads to their judgement and the execution of the Day of the Lord upon them.

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP52-66.

PARALLEL SESSIONS

Parallel Session, Saturday Afternoon, October 18.
Mike Moore, ‘The Coming Kingdom: Do we have to be Premillennial?’

KEY WORDS
|| Kingdom of God || Prophecy || Biblical interpretation || Words of Jesus ||
|| Israel || Christian Mission ||

ABSTRACT
Many Premillennialists believe that Premillennialism alone establishes a proper biblical foundation for establishing a future hope for the Jewish people. Historically, however, some Amillenniallists and Postmillenniallists have also believed in a bright future for the nation of Israel. Furthermore, though Premillennialism insists on a literalistic hermeneutic, Premillenniallists tend to be selectively literalistic in their interpretation of the words of Scripture in general and the words of Jesus in particular. While Premillennialists are, in the main, committed to obeying the Great Commission, there is a tendency to be pessimistic about the future.

This paper addresses the following questions of Premillennialism: Does one have to be Premillennial to hold a future hope for Israel? Does one have to be Premillennial to rightly understand the Bible? Does one have to be Premillennial to rightly understand words of Jesus? Does one have to be Premillennial to rightly understand the Great Commission with a view to encouraging an optimistic, as opposed to a pessimistic, view of the future?

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP67-75.

Parallel Session, Saturday Afternoon, October 18.
Anthony Royle, ‘The Keys of the Kingdom: Christian Halakhah for the Realised Eschaton’

KEY WORDS
|| Kingdom of Heaven || Eschatology || Ethics || Law ||
|| Halakhah || Jewish Hermeneutics ||

ABSTRACT
This paper seeks to look at how eschatology impacts Christian moral behaviour. Previously, scholars have noted how eschatology has been used as a motivating force in provoking moral behaviour. I propose that a realised eschatology, the inaugurated Kingdom of God, impacts Christian ethics in a more theologically informed and practically equipped way. The Kingdom that Jesus established, based on the Kingdom given to the Son of Man in Daniel 7, provides numerous theological points that form a hermeneutic for the interpretation of Biblical Law (Halakhah). This becomes apparent when surveying the many case studies in the NT that help us understand how the Kingdom impacted the approach to the application of the Jewish Scriptures by Jesus and His apostles.

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP76-84.

Parallel Session, Saturday Afternoon, October 18.
Daniel Button, ‘Creation Care in the Context of Eschatology’

KEY WORDS
|| Creation Care || missio Dei || Environmental Mission || Eschatology ||
|| Apocalypse || New Creation ||

ABSTRACT
The concept of missio Dei has recently been subjected to scrutiny and theological re-interpretation - notably in response to the advent of ‘Creation Care’ as a key component in the changing landscape of mission praxis. The ‘stewardship model’ of Christian environmentalism no longer seems robust enough to withstand the expanding crisis of climate change (for those who accept the scientific data). Yet is ‘saving the planet’ a valid theological agenda? When creation care is framed in an eschatological context, immediate questions arise regarding apocalyptic expectations, and the expected ‘end’ of this world. Is environmental mission a fruitless endeavour, or does it rather demand a grander objective on par with ‘reaching the world with the gospel’? The nature of the transition from creation to New Creation becomes the crucial theological underpinning for discerning our missional responsibility toward the environment. If Christ’s return signals not an end but a transition, then perhaps it is possible that ‘our labour is not in vain’. This paper seeks to develop a rational, purposeful, biblical justification for creation care in light of apocalyptic expectations and the concept of a new creation

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP85-95.

Parallel Session, Saturday Afternoon, October 18.
Stefan Bosman, ‘The “Israel of God” in Light of Comparative Jewish Texts’

KEY WORDS
|| Israel of God || Galatians 6:16 || Supersessionism || Replacement Theology ||
||
Traditionsgeschichte || Peace and Mercy ||

ABSTRACT
This study seeks to establish the identity of “the Israel of God” in Paul’s enigmatic statement in Galatians 6:16b, “peace [be] upon them and mercy and upon the Israel of God.” (eipene ep’ autous kai eleos kai epi ton Israel.) Comparing this Pauline text with contemporary Jewish texts uncovers a possible trajectory of Jewish traditions that suggests that the Israel of God points to nothing else, but (eschatological) ethnic Israel. While this is not a new position, the argument informed by Traditionsgeschichte does contain a new proposal, not hitherto considered. Furthermore, the result of this tradition-historical investigation affirms the findings of grammatical, lexical, and contextual investigations. As a result, the conclusions of this study challenge the still widely held supersessionist reading of Galatians 6:16, which poses that “the Israel of God” points to the Church.

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP96-107.

Parallel Session, Saturday Afternoon, October 18.
Thomas Fretwell, ‘Assessing Socio-Political Arguments in Support of Supersessionism’

KEY WORDS
|| Church || Israel || Palestinian || Suppersessionalism || Zionism || Anti-Semitism ||

ABSTRACT
The question of whether Israel has been replaced by the Church in the plan of God has long been debated by biblical scholars. The contemporary debate has focused largely on hermeneutical differences and has given little attention to the way contemporary socio-political situations are being utilised to foster support for a supersessionist theology. This paper will examine the influence of this growing phenomenon within evangelicalism. Specifically, this paper will look at the accusations levied against modern Israel such as racism and apartheid in order to show the way evangelical supersessionists are promoting these accusations in their publications. These claims will be assessed to ascertain their accuracy and relevancy to the issue of supersessionism. This paper concludes that supersessionists cannot resort to exploiting the contemporary political situation in order to make their theological position more plausible and deny Israel’s role in the outworking of the Kingdom program.

Uploaded/Published : December 31, 2014 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP96-107.

PAPERS

Conference Paper, Saturday Afternoon, October 18.
Craig Blaising, ‘The Coming Kingdom and Biblical Interpretation’

KEY WORDS
|| Hermeneutics || Israel || Bible-Scripture || Supersessionalism || Speech-Act ||
|| Interpretation || Evangelical || Language || Definition || Promise ||

ABSTRACT
This paper, on the Coming Kingdom and Biblical Interpretation, describes the methods used to interpret the Bible. Initially this involves an analytical summary of the historical difference between literal and figurative approaches to Scripture and how an allegorical reading of the Bible was used to minimize the role played by the Jewish people in the plan of God. Typology is used today by a supersessionist approach to the Bible to reject the national and territorial promises of Israel and spiritualize them as being fulfilled in Jesus and thereby the Church. In conclusion we can demonstrate the weakness of this approach and argue for a holistic reading of the Bible in which all of God’s promises, including those that speak of the Jewish people and the Land of Israel, are truly fulfilled.

Uploaded/Published : March 6, 2015 || ERTP Vol 2, 2014, pages, CP121-134.

Craig Blaising’s paper was originally published
as‘Israel and Hermeneutics’ in
Darrell L. Bock and Mitch Glaser,
The People, the Land, and the Future of Israel:
Israel and the Jewish People in the Plan of God
.
Our thanks and acknowledgement are to
Kregel Publications for permission
to include it here:

The People, the Land, and the Future of Israel

The Evangelical Review, Volume 1, (2013)

The Evangelical Review, Volume 2, (2014)

TER Vol 2, (2014) ‘Thy Kingdom Come’
Conference Papers

The Evangelical Review, Volume 3, (2015)

TER Vol 3, (2015) ‘Christianity & Culture’ Conference Papers

The Evangelical Review, Volume 4, (2016)

The Evangelical Review, Volume 5, (2017)

To access a PDF file
of an article or review go to
the “Journal Access” page
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JOURNAL ACCESS


The Evangelical Review ~ Vol. 2, 2014

Contents ~ Pagination

Articles


John J. Johnson

A1-15

Sylvie Avakian

A16-28

Review Articles


P.H. Brazier

RA1-7

Timothy Lim T.N.

RA8-14

James A. Motter

RA15-21

Conference Papers


Calvin L. Smith (editorial)

CP1

Derek Tidball

CP2-10

Calvin L. Smith

CP11-18

Mitch Glaser

CP19-45

Darrell Bock

CP46-51

Daniel Nessim

CP52-66

Mike Moore

CP67-75

Anthony Royle

CP76-84

Daniel Button

CP85-95

Stefan Bosman

CP96-107

Thomas Fretwell

CP108-120

Book Reviews


Review of Hoek & Thacker

BR1-2

Review of Moberly

BR3-4

Review of Padilla and Phan

BR5-6

Review of Samantha Zacher

BR7-8

Review of Edwards (Romans)

BR9-10

Review of Yancey

BR11-12

Review of Smith

BR13-15

Review of Day

BR16-17

Pagination

Note, page numbering is chronological, and is unique to each section, that is, each form of material. The first article to be published each year will be pp. A.1-12 (for instance); the second article pp. A.13-29, and so on. Page numbers for articles are prefaced by a capital A. (and so on)—

SECTIONS

Articles :

ERTP Forum :

Essays (Series)

Review Articles :

Conference Papers :

Book Reviews :

Research Updates :

PREFIX

A

EF

ES

RA

CP

BR

RU

Volume 2, 2014

The Evangelical Review

of Theology & Politics

Conference
Programme:

Westminster, London
October 17-18, 2014

Full programme : PDF file

Friday

19:30 ‘The Coming Kingdom and the Lord’s Prayer’
Dr Derek Tidball: Matthew 6

Saturday

10:30 ‘The Coming Kingdom and the Hope of Israel’
Dr Calvin Smith: Romans 11

11:15 ‘The Coming Kingdom and the Great Commission’

Dr Mitch Glaser: Matthew 28

12:15 LUNCH AND MARKETPLACE

13:15 ‘The Coming Kingdom and the Words of Jesus’

Dr Darrell Bock

14:15 ‘The Coming Kingdom and the Day of the Lord’

Mr Daniel Nessim: Joel 2

15:45 PARALLEL SESSIONS

Mike Moore, ‘The Coming Kingdom: Do we have to be Premillennial?’

Anthony Royle, ‘The Keys of the Kingdom: Christian Halakhah for the Realised Eschaton’

Daniel Button, ‘Creation Care in the Context of Eschatology’

Stefan Bosman, ‘The “Israel of God” in Light of Comparative Jewish Texts’

Thomas Fretwell, ‘Assessing Socio-Political Arguments in Support of Supersessionism’


17:00 The Coming Kingdom and Biblical Interpretation

Dr Craig Blaising


18:00 Panel Discussion, Q&A


18:45 Conference Ends

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